To my Brother and my Role Model

Allie Little-

When someone asks you “Who is your biggest role model and why?” normally people say their parents or some famous figurehead. They don’t typically say their sibling.

For me, though, my brother is and has always been my biggest role model.

He has supported me, cheered me on, given me (mostly) unbiased advice, and has simply been there for me my entire life.

He has shown me that having a real personality, and not hiding it, will get you a long way. He taught me that being weird and unique is a good thing and if someone else can’t see that, they aren’t worth the time or effort.

From my brother, I have learned to love comic books, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Pokémon, and movies so bad they’re good.

Growing up with him, I was taught how to perfect my sarcasm, a skill we both used (and still use) to drive our parents nuts.

Even though I think all of these things are important skills to have, I know that my brother has taught me some even more important things, whether he knows it or not.

While watching his experience in college when I was only in junior high, I told myself that I would get my degree to make him proud. Now that I am extremely close to that goal, I have set an even higher one for myself, again for my brother.

This might seem weird to people; typically people go to college for themselves or to please their parents. I think I have a unique case, though.

My brother is seven years older than me, so we do not have that typical big brother/little sister relationship. We rarely fought the way siblings do. We were, and still are, best friends, even with the age gap.

One of the things that was enhanced by this age difference was how much I looked up to him. I wanted to do and like everything he did. He read Harry Potter, so I did too. He watched Pokémon every morning before school and I was right there next to him every morning. He could skateboard, so I tried to learn too. He played videogames and taught me to as well. I wanted to do everything he did, and in some ways I wanted to do more.

Our sibling rivalry was barely a rivalry. Sure, we would try to one-up each other, but we would cheer each other on the entire time.

Having a brother as a cheering section helped me make the decision to go to college, push myself to graduate in three years, and then go to grad school. I find it hard to make any big decision without talking to him first because his opinion matters so much.

After steering me in the right direction for my entire life, I can easily trust his judgment about anything. He knows small things like which computers I should buy or what comedian to get into. He always tells me which situations I should fight for and which to walk away from, as well as which boyfriends will pass his test and which aren’t worth the time.

Why not listen to him when he’s almost always right? (something I could never say to him in risk of his head doubling in size)

As we’ve gotten older, it is more and more evident that he just keeps getting better at this, maybe because now the seven-year age difference isn’t as evident as before. We aren’t being separated between junior high and high school or living at home and already moved out. I’m still looked at as the little sister because that’s what I am, but now we’re both adults and we’re treated that way.

Every day I’m grateful for the fact that I have such a great role model/support system/friend/brother all wrapped into one.

I will never be able to thank him, my parents, and Dan enough for pushing me to follow every one of my dreams no matter how big and scary they may seem.

Sadly, this was my final letter from the editor. This issue marks my last as Editor-in-Chief and the first issue for Dan as the new Editor-in-Chief. I know that I will be leaving The Rambler in very capable hands and I am excited to see what he, as well as the new staff, does with the coolest student-run newspaper on campus!

For the final time,
Allie Little
Editor-in-Chief

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