Rambler Rant: Giving 110 Percent is Literally Impossible

By: Dylan Howard

Welcome back to school everybody. For many of us seniors, our streak of 16 consecutive years with Christmas Break has finally come to an end. For some of us, this is our final semester ever of any formal schooling. In just a few short months we will be out of college and starting our lives as members of the “working class.” To many students, this is viewed as a time of optimism with feelings of freedom, and choice in our lives. In reality, most of us will greatly struggle finding jobs. Those of us lucky enough to find jobs will more than likely not enjoy the job we have; we’ll be underpaid, our lives will be extremely difficult for years as student loans need to be paid off on top of our newly acquired car, house, and healthcare bills. Some of us will probably end up homeless, we will then realize that all of the years of education we’ve taken did a horrible job of preparing us for any sort of financial planning or responsibility. And, to top it all off, there will always be a haunting and persistent thought that nothing in life has any real meaning and that with each struggling year filled with anxiety, sadness, and tears we look forward more and more to our ever approaching death. Adulting is hard.

But there’s always one thing that seems to brighten up our day! The time honored and revered world of athletic prowess that we call “sports” impacts many lives. Sports can, with no other assistance other than its existence, bring unity to entire cities and regions. Sports can serve as a comfort to people after catastrophes to inspire togetherness and patriotism. Most importantly for parents out there, sports can serve as a two to three hour baby sitter every school day which can be used for mom and dad to have a drink, and try to reignite that spark that has gone out in their relationship. Just take the little blue pill Mr. Soccer Dad. Oh, and flowers. Try flowers.

There is one thing, however, that I truly cannot stand about sports. Specifically, professional leagues like the MLB, NBA, and NFL. Is it that they get paid millions and millions of dollars to throw a ball around? No, compared to the billions they make for their owners, the athletes should make millions for themselves. In general, I don’t have a quarrel with the sports world. The only thing I truly hate most about sports is all of the annoying, cliche, regurgitated, uninspiring rhetoric that every athlete says after every game.

You know what I’m talking about. Questions like “So Mr. Star Athlete, you guys came out with the victory tonight, what were the keys to your success?” are usually responded to with answers like, “Oh you know, we just came out here, and gave 110% from start to finish. Our guys never gave up and we just try to get better, and better every day. This is why we’re a team, this is why we’re a brotherhood, we just came out here and at the end of the day we just did what he had to do.”

That reporter-to-athlete interaction might sounds like hyperbole, but it’s really not. Completely worthless conversations like that happen all over the professional sports scenes every day. These trite platitudes need to stop. They are less of an explanation for success, and more of a reminder that many of these athletes didn’t finish college, or if they did it was probably with a major in basket weaving.   

It’s obviously impossible to give 110 percent. As a matter of fact, I would say most athletes only give about 75 percent effort. The other 25 percent is thinking about Wendy’s, or how they’re going to pass their next drug test, or that new episode of Game of Thrones that they haven’t watched yet. And enough of this “brotherhood” talk. I get it, you guys play a game together, but most professional athletes are in it 10% because they love the game, and 90% money. League of Legends champions play a game too. Does that make them brothers as well?

 

 

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